Backpacker admiring the sunny Gaeltacht coast

Why Gaelic

There are many reasons why tourists come to Scotland but many want to experience the language and culture of the country.

This is especially true of tourists who come for pleasure to sample the varied events that make Scotland attractive - Bagpiping, Highland Games, Genealogy, Whisky, Landscape, Wildlife or the Taste of Scotland. Tourists of this nature want an authentic Scottish experience which includes the culture, landscape and languages of Scotland.

When we consider that five out of ten of the top ten places to visit in Scotland are in traditional Gaelic speaking areas it makes even more sense to businesses involved in tourism to make an effort to use Gaelic in their day to day activities.

We think it would be beneficial to your business to have a smattering of Gaelic or even just the willingness to try a couple of common phrases. This toolkit should provide you with the basics needed to get started. Speaking Gaelic (or even a brave attempt at trying to) would make a big difference to how tourists would view your business. By making the effort to learn basic greetings or comments about the weather, tourists would feel that they had at least had a taste of the language.

Also, it may give you a little edge over your rivals. And you never know, this personal touch may mean that tourists will return to you again.

When we consider that five out of ten of the top ten places to visit in Scotland are in traditional Gaelic speaking areas it makes even more sense to businesses involved in tourism to make an effort to use Gaelic in their day to day activities.

We think it would be beneficial to your business to have a smattering of Gaelic or even just the willingness to try a couple of common phrases. This toolkit should provide you with the basics needed to get started. Speaking Gaelic (or even a brave attempt at trying to) would make a big difference to how tourists would view your business. By making the effort to learn basic greetings or comments about the weather, tourists would feel that they had at least had a taste of the language.

Also, it may give you a little edge over your rivals. And you never know, this personal touch may mean that tourists will return to you again.

To quote an old Irish Gaelic saying:

"'S fheàrr Gàidhlig bhriste na Beurla chliste" (Better broken Gaelic that nimble English).